Blue Knot Foundation Blog

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Aug
28

By Julie Steele

I’m not yet in my twilight years, but turning seventy has focused my mind, especially as my partner and I are about to embark on an overseas trip. What if something happens to us while we are away? 

Over the past couple of weeks we’ve been discussing our Wills. After ensuring our family and friends are taken care of, our minds turned to which charities should we bequeath part of our estate. 

Top of my list was Blue Knot Foundation. As an adult survivor myself, I have observed this organisation from its genesis, and watched it grow into the important and vibrant not-for-profit it is today.

Blue Knot Day Photo competition 2016Writing my Will was an interesting journey. It raised many questions about the importance of relationships with family and friends. Do I leave more to those members who are less well off? Or less to those members who have not bothered to keep in touch? Should that portion of my Will be shared equally amongst all members? 

With charities it was much easier, or so I thought. I knew I wanted to support charities working in specific areas: education/support of sexual assault survivors; education of Aboriginal young people; refugee resettlement support; support for asylum seekers who have experienced torture and trauma. After I had carried out a thorough Internet search, based on certain criteria, I decided on the four charities.

One of my criteria was that the charities did not spend their income on fancy offices, big salaries, or too many glossy brochures. Another, of course, was corporate governance. I visited the charities of my choice in person, and in all instances found this to be a far more rewarding experience than I had imagined. Here I learned of the passion of staff and volunteers for working for an NGO, the love of witnessing positive change in their clients. I also observed the open plan offices and camaraderie amongst all levels of staff. And the pride they had in their workplace.

And I learned in these meetings of the struggle to attract funds, of how many more programs they could run if they had the money. The consistent theme was ‘we would love to support more clients, but…’

I was surprised to hear that few people make bequests in their Wills to our charitable organisations. Although the charities cannot count a bequest as income (and, of course, a Will can be changed at any time), bequests are shown in their Financial Statements, indicating funds have been promised.

That promise shows the individual NGO that people have faith in their longevity, and value the work they do to support vulnerable people.

Personally this exercise has brought me an enormous amount of pleasure, and introduced me to some truly remarkable Australians. 

Bequeathing part of my estate to charities is a most rewarding experience.


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Testimonials

“Blue Knot Foundation has a key role to play in the building of community capacity in care provision to those who have experienced childhood abuse and trauma in any environment.”

NIALL MULLIGAN Manager, Lifeline Northern Rivers

“I think Blue Knot Foundation is a fantastic support organisation for people who have experienced childhood trauma/abuse, for their families/close friends and for professionals who would like to learn how to more effectively work with these people.”

Psychologist Melbourne

“It's such a beautiful thing that you are doing. Helping people to get through this.”

ANONYMOUS

“It was only last September when I discovered the Blue Knot Foundation website and I will never forget the feeling of support and empathy that I received when I finally made the first phone call to Blue Knot Helpline, which was also the first time I had ever spoken about my abuse.”

STEVEN

"At last there is some sound education and empathetic support for individuals and partners impacted by such gross boundary violations.”

TAMARA

Contact Us

Phone: 02 8920 3611
Email: admin@blueknot.org.au
PO Box 597 Milsons Point NSW 1565
Hours: Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm AEST

Blue Knot Helpline
Phone: 1300 657 380
Email: helpline@blueknot.org.au 
Hours: Mon-Sun, 9am-5pm AEST

For media comment, please contact:
Dr Cathy Kezelman AM
0425 812 197 or ckezelman@blueknot.org.au

For media enquiries, please contact: 
Jo Scard
0457 725 953 or jo@fiftyacres.com