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Blue Knot Foundation Blog

Check out our recent blog posts to stay up to date with our work, latest research and articles curated by the Blue Knot Foundation Marketing & Communications team. Should you have any suggestions or contributions please contact us via email: marketing@blueknot.org.au.

Articles

30

A submission by Lisa Williams, highlighting why ASCA is a vital service:

Most abuse happens in the home, and survivors will fall into a trap of forming abusive relationships, so to expect them to lean on family and close friends is not (a) always realistic; and (b) safe.

Also, friends and well-meaning people are simply not equipped to deal with the level of complex trauma involved with sexual abuse - it takes maturity and training to step back and not be distressed by this issue.

I’ve been there for survivors I’ve met on my journey – but after five years seeing this person unable to let go of their abuser, I simply gave them the ASCA counselling number and wished the person the best, saying if they wanted to press charges I’d back them up.

The ASCA information and counselling is clear and objective and relates specifically to Trauma Informed Care. The information it provides crystalises everything for me and assists me to select the right kind of therapy, and not waste any more time and money. It has taken over twenty years to get a correct diagnosis, and it is only when I started to access ASCA in 2010 that this happened.

The counsellors at ASCA are amazing – they just get it. I feel sane when I speak to an ASCA Counsellor and they have been on my journey now for five years. I walk away feeling more empowered and an adult – not a victim.

ASCA is an invaluable resource, not only to survivors, but the health and justice system, to make sense of the non-sensical maze that is child abuse.

It is an informed perspective and one that saved my life and gave me the courage to report both my stepfather and my father. ASCA is the voice of reason in a world where reason does not exist.

Comments

Sam
# Sam
Wednesday, 30 September 2015 1:51 PM
Thank you for your post!

The trauma-informed perspective delivered to the community by ASCA is invaluable. With time and resources, hopefully the trauma informed approach filters down to organisations, practitioners, workplaces, police force to shift the current response where
"...friends and well-meaning people are simply not equipped to deal with the level of complex trauma involved with sexual abuse - it takes maturity and training to step back and not be distressed by this issue".

is no longer the norm for a survivor seeking help. We need more people in society to develop an attitude of 'this is not okay or acceptable' and refer to complex-trauma appropriate services like ASCA who have the knowledge and expertise to empower survivors from the

Well done to ASCA on their frontline approach and delivery of needed professional helpline services and also tackling systematic change through their workshops, continued advocacy and advisory on the needs of survivors to the government and development of Best Practice guidelines for Trauma-informed practice and care.

Recovery is an investment in our future and represents the potential for vast economic savings as a country if we address this problem by getting people the right information, the right help and trauma-informed understanding at the right time.

ASCA needs more funding from governments to realise a better Australian future and allow survivors the opportunity to break free from their limiting pasts and participate and add value to our society. Please resource them to achieve their vision over time, as this no doubt aligns itself with the Vision of the Australian government for future prosperity as a nation, no longer staying silent and having the courage to say 'It is not okay. It is not acceptable." to domestic violence and child abuse.

Child abuse is non-sensical. But ASCA provides a sensible approach to freeing the Australian public of this widespread, culturally-engrained epidemic.

We can change this.
I am asking for a better future.
We deserve a better future.

*I don't work for ASCA, I'm a survivor, I just agree with their leadership and strategy in the field





You're right, it does
Cathy
# Cathy
Wednesday, 30 September 2015 1:51 PM
The title of this article brought to mind a poem that I wrote as part of my recovery, and reminds me why dedicated and knowledgeable organisations such as ASCA are so important in helping to unravel the past and understand where victims are coming from. It's title is "Inexplicable".

INEXPLICABLE:
Now that I know why I behave
In certain not-so-normal ways
I find myself wondering how
I could ever explain it to anyone else

How do you explain the inexplicable?
How do you describe the indescribable?
How do they fathom the unfathomable?
How do they comprehend the incomprehensible?

Now that I understand the reasons why
I feel frightened all the time
I find myself wondering if
Anyone else could understand it

How do you explain the inexplicable?
How do you describe the indescribable?
How do they fathom the unfathomable?
How do they comprehend the incomprehensible?

Although I now know what happened to me
I don't think it's something I could explain
And so others will have to make what they will
Of those parts of me they find inexplicable

How do you explain the inexplicable?
How do you describe the indescribable?
How do they fathom the unfathomable?
How do they comprehend the incomprehensible?

Anonymous User
# Anonymous User
Wednesday, 30 September 2015 1:51 PM
Dear Cathy,
Thank you for sharing your poem. We have included it in the October 2015 issue of our Breaking Free newsletter.
Best,
The ASCA Team
Jennifer
Wednesday, 30 September 2015 1:51 PM
Well I would like to say thanks for sharing and I hope you guys do not mind I'm not If I'm an American but I found your website intriguing refreshing hopeful informative and exciting. I experienced Adult survivor of incest resulting emotional damage resulting extreme stress reactions emotional and verbal seemly out of portion aka drama queen title indirectly undermining my quality of life but, I wore a sweet smile to attempt to hide my secret struggles. I sought out SOI (survivors of incest) as a young woman at the tender age of 19, here in the Texas. The more I understand the more I want to find my calling to help others. I have drafted portions a book but it's dark at times Describing Monsters who VIOLENTLY RAPE 5 & 7 year olds and the Divine intervention that saved me on so many levels yet I am still hurting. I would love to learn more about PTSD, Anxiety and Panic disorders, ADHD and no relief in sight, until I cover my Maslows hierarchy of needs. Maslow if I am correct is the name of
Anonymous User
# Anonymous User
Wednesday, 30 September 2015 1:51 PM
Dear Jennifer,
It's good to read that you've found the ASCA website useful. We're sorry to read that you were traumatised as a child. The ASCA website has many links to further reading in these areas of your interest. We wish you well on your journey and in your desire to help others.
Regards,
The ASCA Team

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Testimonials

“Blue Knot Foundation has a key role to play in the building of community capacity in care provision to those who have experienced childhood abuse and trauma in any environment.”

NIALL MULLIGAN Manager, Lifeline Northern Rivers

“I think Blue Knot Foundation is a fantastic support organisation for people who have experienced childhood trauma/abuse, for their families/close friends and for professionals who would like to learn how to more effectively work with these people.”

Psychologist Melbourne

“It's such a beautiful thing that you are doing. Helping people to get through this.”

ANONYMOUS

“It was only last September when I discovered the Blue Knot Foundation website and I will never forget the feeling of support and empathy that I received when I finally made the first phone call to Blue Knot Helpline, which was also the first time I had ever spoken about my abuse.”

STEVEN

"At last there is some sound education and empathetic support for individuals and partners impacted by such gross boundary violations.”

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